Lindeman Audio

www.seanlindeman.com
seanlindeman@gmail.com
The picture above is a V76, I took the picture at Hyde Street Studios. The V76 was designed by the Insitut fur Rundfunktechnik and built from 1958 by TAB. This company also built other units for this series, as the V72 and 72a (low/mid gain preamp) and the U73 (tube compressor). The V76 was designed for applications where the “standard” V72 could not provide enough gain and where it was essential to have a switchable variety of gain steps plus some selectable high and low frequency pre filtering.

The picture above is a V76, I took the picture at Hyde Street Studios. The V76 was designed by the Insitut fur Rundfunktechnik and built from 1958 by TAB. This company also built other units for this series, as the V72 and 72a (low/mid gain preamp) and the U73 (tube compressor). The V76 was designed for applications where the “standard” V72 could not provide enough gain and where it was essential to have a switchable variety of gain steps plus some selectable high and low frequency pre filtering.

RCA Model 74 “Junior Velocity” Microphone - RCA introduced the first of its ribbon velocity microphones in the early 1930’s (the 44, the PB-31, the PB-90, and several others). They were expensive, high quality units intended primarily for broadcast, film, and recording work. They saw a market for a smaller, less expensive model for less demanding applications, and so the “Junior Velocity” microphone was developed. It was introduced in 1935 and remained in production through the 1950’s. This RCA microphone sounds just as great as it did the day it was made. This microphone belongs to Hyde Street Studios.

RCA Model 74 “Junior Velocity” Microphone - RCA introduced the first of its ribbon velocity microphones in the early 1930’s (the 44, the PB-31, the PB-90, and several others). They were expensive, high quality units intended primarily for broadcast, film, and recording work. They saw a market for a smaller, less expensive model for less demanding applications, and so the “Junior Velocity” microphone was developed. It was introduced in 1935 and remained in production through the 1950’s. This RCA microphone sounds just as great as it did the day it was made. This microphone belongs to Hyde Street Studios.

Designed in 1972, the 1081 was originally conceived as a combined mic/line preamp and equalizer section for the Neve modular consoles. A glance through the credits on today’s platinum-selling albums reveals that these vintage consoles are still widely used to great effect, confirming the 1081’s status as a truly classic component in a recording front-end or mixing environment. Still being hand-built, the 1081 modules in Burnley, UK are made much the same way as the original modules, using the original components, hand-wound transformers, and time-honed construction methods.
The 1081 provides remarkable sensitivity, fast and musical response to transients, plus inimitable Neve equalization featuring effective high- and low-pass filters designed to separate unwanted signal outside the passband. This gives users a flexible tool with which to shape new sounds and control any part of the audio spectrum. The curves and slopes have been carefully tailored to enable users to exercise maximum technical and artistic skill.
Over three decades of engineers have found the 1081 an indispensable tool for recording and mixing drums, bass and percussion. As with all Neve outboard gear, users are assured the highest quality signal acquisition, thanks to uncompromising Class AB circuitry, hand-wound Neve-designed transformers, and unrivalled attention to every last component and construction detail.
This photo is of one of the 1081’s from Hyde Street Studios Neve 8038 board. It was taken out of the board for recapping. Very sweet!

Designed in 1972, the 1081 was originally conceived as a combined mic/line preamp and equalizer section for the Neve modular consoles. A glance through the credits on today’s platinum-selling albums reveals that these vintage consoles are still widely used to great effect, confirming the 1081’s status as a truly classic component in a recording front-end or mixing environment. Still being hand-built, the 1081 modules in Burnley, UK are made much the same way as the original modules, using the original components, hand-wound transformers, and time-honed construction methods.

The 1081 provides remarkable sensitivity, fast and musical response to transients, plus inimitable Neve equalization featuring effective high- and low-pass filters designed to separate unwanted signal outside the passband. This gives users a flexible tool with which to shape new sounds and control any part of the audio spectrum. The curves and slopes have been carefully tailored to enable users to exercise maximum technical and artistic skill.

Over three decades of engineers have found the 1081 an indispensable tool for recording and mixing drums, bass and percussion. As with all Neve outboard gear, users are assured the highest quality signal acquisition, thanks to uncompromising Class AB circuitry, hand-wound Neve-designed transformers, and unrivalled attention to every last component and construction detail.

This photo is of one of the 1081’s from Hyde Street Studios Neve 8038 board. It was taken out of the board for recapping. Very sweet!

This photo was taken about one week ago, and is of the two C 12s that are at Hyde Street Studios. The AKG C 12 is considered to be one of the best microphones in the world. It is a multi-patterned mic with a very open, bright, airy sounding character and can be heard on everything from Paul McCartney’s bass on Revolver to Tom Petty’s vocals on Wildflowers. Let me tell you, listening to these microphones through the Neve in “Studio A” is like listening to music for the first time. I absolutely love them!

This photo was taken about one week ago, and is of the two C 12s that are at Hyde Street Studios. The AKG C 12 is considered to be one of the best microphones in the world. It is a multi-patterned mic with a very open, bright, airy sounding character and can be heard on everything from Paul McCartney’s bass on Revolver to Tom Petty’s vocals on Wildflowers. Let me tell you, listening to these microphones through the Neve in “Studio A” is like listening to music for the first time. I absolutely love them!

I took this photo earlier today of the Hammond B-3 organ/ Leslie speaker we have at Hyde Street Studios. In the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s the distinctive sound of the B-3 organ (often played through a Leslie speaker) was widely used. It can be heard on songs such as “A Whiter Shade of Pale” by Procol Harum and Steve Winwood’s “Gimme Some Lovin’”. The last electromechanical Hammond organ came off the assembly line in the mid-1970s. Hyde Street Studios beautifully maintained 1965 Hammond B-3 sounds just as smooth as it did when it arrived.
I took this photo earlier today of the Hammond B-3 organ/ Leslie speaker we have at Hyde Street Studios. In the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s the distinctive sound of the B-3 organ (often played through a Leslie speaker) was widely used. It can be heard on songs such as “A Whiter Shade of Pale” by Procol Harum and Steve Winwood’s “Gimme Some Lovin’”. The last electromechanical Hammond organ came off the assembly line in the mid-1970s. Hyde Street Studios beautifully maintained 1965 Hammond B-3 sounds just as smooth as it did when it arrived.
This photo was taken in “Studio D” at Hyde Street Studios about half a year ago. Unfortunately, the recording console is gone, however a lot of the outboard gear is still there.

This photo was taken in “Studio D” at Hyde Street Studios about half a year ago. Unfortunately, the recording console is gone, however a lot of the outboard gear is still there.

I’m currently working at Hyde Street Studios in San Francisco as an Intern. I took this photo in “Studio A” about one month ago. It looks a little funky because it’s a panoramic shot comprised of four images that are sloppily glued together.

I’m currently working at Hyde Street Studios in San Francisco as an Intern. I took this photo in “Studio A” about one month ago. It looks a little funky because it’s a panoramic shot comprised of four images that are sloppily glued together.

Hello everyone!
I’ll be dedicating this blog to everything that is audio in my life. I hope you enjoy!
Sean Lindeman 

Hello everyone!

I’ll be dedicating this blog to everything that is audio in my life. I hope you enjoy!


Sean Lindeman